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philadelphia, but also many others. no one announced a competition, least about the united nations, better race began even before the u.n. officially it is to come a race began to get the attention of the world diplomats and when the price of becoming the capital of the world. it was a race that said it boosters trying to get attention for their hometown and a hometown and abrasive newspaper reporters who are covering the story, but in many cases often created the story so as to boost the campaigns for bringing the united nations to their own localities. the race went to san francisco, where the u.n. charter was drafted, went to london, where the u.n. met for the first time. it went to mackinac island where the nation's governors that there can't grants-in-aid and 45. he went to new york on which became the base of operations for the phrase searching teams who would determine the outcome. especially in the northeast and including philadelphia. also the sisters are pregnant or a race to win a price that no one had announced, the world's diplomats were on their own parallel track, a more delibera
cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engineers found that development along the waterfront was causing pollution. so their search led them to the nearby schuylkill river. philadelphia developed technologies to pump water from the river into the city
in the philadelphia society, and around the first table from different groups around the country, let's figure out how we can work more effectively together. last year richard wagoner tells the 35th annual resource bank at colorado springs, 600 people, 32 different countries, 325 ceos of different organizations get together, days talking to each other, always chatter about let's cooperate on this process or maybe we can work together over here and something where we agree. bringing that conservative movement together is one of the critical world heritage has played and we are not there to knock somebody else but to build up other organizations and figure out how to work together and be more positive. you know this from the lectures, seminars we put a, from times when a congressman or staffer, congressional and senatorial committee will call us and say we need somebody over here to testify on this particular subject and i will call derek morgan or one of our experts. we don't have anybody like that but out at the hoover is they have a guy -- we call him up and arrange for him to come to give a lecture
deliberately ignoring the murder trial of a philadelphia dollar. little did i know that one week later i wasn't smoking. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostilityagitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these stop taking chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these stop taking chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vesl problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get medical help right away if you have symptoms of heart attack stroke. use caution when driving or operating machinery. common side effects include nausea, trouble sleeping and unusual dreams.
under way in the murder trial of a philadelphia abortion provider. dr. kermit gosnell has been accused of killing four babies born alive after botched abortions. marley hall reports from philadelphia that gosnell could get the death penalty if he's convicted. >> reporter: lawyers in the murder trial after philadelphia abortion provider arrived at court this morning where jurors are set to begin deliberating the fate of dr. kermit gosnell. the 72-year-old veteran doctor is accused of cutting the spinal cords of four babies born alive following illegislate-term abortions. he's also accused of killing a 41-year-old patient during a 2009 procedure. during closing arts yesterday, prosecutors wheeled out a filthy table to show jurors conditions inside the clinic he ran for 30 years, a place they called a house of horrors. but gosnell's lawyer argued the babies were already dead and the patient's deft was an accident. -- death was an accident. they accused prosecutors of sensationalizing the case to make headlines. >> house of horrors it was not and that was the evidence we argued. >> reporte
in mississippi philadelphia coalition in 2004 in an effort to bring those responsible for the murders to justice. the coalition also educations new generations of mississippians about their history. he joins us tonight from jackson, mississippi. welcome to "the war room." >> thank you very much. >> michael: tell me a little bit about the philadelphia coalition. what are the goals of the coalition. >> it was threefold. acknowledge and recognition of what happened -- also it was also accepting that acknowledge, and us being able to move together and move forward as a community to say that you know, what was done in 1964 is wrong, and it needed to be righted. and our final goal was to make sure that our young people were educated. so that the things that happened in 1964 would not be allowed to happen again in 2014 or 2015. >> michael: it's a amazing it's sort as if you are an ambassador for that era to this error, and that seems like something that is necessary. i want to address what some of our viewers might be unfamiliar with, which is the case itself. can you bri
politically involved back in pennsylvania, and downtown philadelphia was not strong goldwater territory. [laughter] >> really? [laughter] >> but introducing barry goldwater at the university of pennsylvania with roberts, who even then, i think, was about 85. he passed at age 102, but robert was introducing him, and these two one brilliant professor, and i'm up there to introduce goldwater, and kids in the third and fourth row threw tomatoes and eggs at us. that was not fun. [laughter] the young methamphetamine today -- people today who have rich history today and the political leaders and the institutional base, and you mentioned before some of the friendly competitors downtown like cato, aei, and others with whom we work americans for tax reform -- i'll leave somebody else but that's dangerous, but they were not there 40 years ago when we were youngsters and you were central to the goldwater camp. by the way, the sunday before election in 1964, the "philadelphia bulletin" called me saying you're the highest ranking goldwater volunteer we can find in eastern pennsylvania, what's going t
salaries. i know because by mom used to work at the va in philadelphia. but we have a huge crisis. we have about two million people who served in iraq and afghanistan, according to a rand study, what was it, 25% of ptsd? something like that. >> and those are the ones who acknowledge they have ptsd. a small percentage of them seek treatment, that treatment is often not good or effective. >> a lot of it's medicinal. >> a lot of it is medicinal, and this is a problem that isn't going away. these are people that are walking our streets and need help. and we have those problems because we sent them to war. and so i just want to say that i touch on this a little bit in the book. one of the survivors of the attack, ed falconer jr., has horrible ptsd and, ultimately, overdoses and dies less than a year after the attack. he was in treatment at the va, and two days after his overdose, the veterans hospital called his dad to let him know that his son was late for his appointment. there needs to be -- somebody needs to do something. and i know there's a lot of talk about this during election years. i
. like most drivers they are expected to be hands-free. >>> a veteran fire captain from philadelphia is killed in the line of duty and we are now hearing from the city's fire commissioner. ♪ alright, let's go. ♪ ♪ shimmy, shimmy chocolate. ♪ ♪ shimmy, shimmy chocolate. ♪ ♪ we, we chocolate cross over. ♪ ♪ yeah, we chocolate cross over. ♪ [ male announcer ] introducing fiber one 80 calorie chocolate cereal. ♪ chocolate. ♪ nom, nom, nom. ♪ the one and only, cheerios ♪ >>> welcome back. live look over oakland this morning. mix of sun, clouds, light winds and temperatures around the bay area this morning holding in the 50s. >>> firefighters in philadelphia are mourning the loss of one of their own for the third time in less than a year. the captain in the department was killed while fighting a fire at a fabric store last night. the roof of the three story building collapsed underneath him. almost one year ago two other firefighters in philadelphia were killed also fighting a fire. >> we will be remembering during a memorial for t
issue with the size of a building. i grow up in the philadelphia area, in new jersey, went to school up and down the east coast. i went to undergrad at duke university and law school at harvard. after clerking for a judge, i came out here and have been in here for the last 14 years. i always assumed i would go back to the philadelphia area because that is where my family is, but i was always interested in sanford cisco in terms of the city, culture, the amazing lgbt community -- i was always interested in san francisco. i am an attorney. i started off in private practice, doing complex litigation. in 2002, i moved to the san francisco city attorney's office, where our work on the trial team, doing trials for the city and doing my own cases and supervising a team of attorneys as well. another huge issue confronting the city is the deferred maintenance on our infrastructure. we have a lot of infrastructure that has been deteriorating because we have not maintained it properly, from our roads to our sewer system to muni. we need to be much more diligent about maintaining our infrastructure
-- the philadelphia abortion doctor accused of eight counts of murder. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the chechen-american teenager accused in the boston marathon bombings now faces a possible death sentence. the filing of charges today officially moved the case into the federal courts, even as the city began returning to normal. dzhokhar tsarnaev was arraigned this morning, at boston's beth israel deaconess hospital, where he remained in serious condition. a short time later came word of the complaint, filed by the u.s. justice department. it formal
likely won't see much about anywhere else. one, the horrifying case of a philadelphia doctor accused of acts of barbarism. the other, serious questions about u.s. drones abroad. more than a decade after 9/11, is the u.s. now creating more terrorists than we're killing? >>> the money lead. it is like the biggest cable channel in the country, except it is not on cable. average users watch an hour and a half of netflix every single day. can the popularity last? is tv being changed forever? >>> and the pop culture lead, god help us, 1.5 billion people watched his video for gangnam style. while i'm still trying to get that out of my head, psy just leased a new single. does he have another hit on his hands or will he suffer the curse of the macarena? >>> we begin with the world lead. a huge mistake, that's what america's secretary of state says north korea would be making if it goes ahead with a missile launch that could happen any minute. john kerry is attending talks in seoul, south korea, which is only about 30 miles from the dmz. he warned that america won't tolerate north korea as a n
a little bit about the greater philadelphia market. i understand that it is a very strong market right now. correct? >> yeah. we are having fun again. >> good. strongest market you have seen in quite some time? >> yes. strongest market since '05, '06. >> it sounds like it's a tight market? >> that's the big hustle right now. it is incredible how much we have sold in the last months. >> which probably explains the drop of 11% on the average days on the market. >> yes. average days on the market is down and the number of properties available is about 31%. it's the lowest inventory i have had since '04. >> let's take a look at the first offering. two bedrooms, one bath, just under 800 square feet. tell me more. >> it's a fantastic entry level home in south iladelia. it's about 19 blocks from city hall. we have all the sports stadiums down there. where rocky ran through the italian market. young person, young couple entry level or going to move into there. it's convenient to shopping and restaurants. >> looks like it's newly renovated too? >> yes. we have a lot of people coming in, taking the
businesses and the murder trial of a philadelphia doctor. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: police in canada say they've broken up a plot to derail a passenger train. they announced today two men have been arrested and charged with planning a terror attack. the suspects live in toronto and montreal, but are not canadian citizens. they allegedly had direction and guidance from al-qaeda, but the plot still was in the planning phase. >> while the r.c.m.p. believed that the accused had the capacity and intent to carry out these criminal acts, there was no imminent threat to the general public, rail employees, train passengers or infrastructure. >> holman: authorities said the plot had no connection to the boston bombings. so far, there's no sign of the poison ricin at the home of a mississippi man accused of sending tainted letters to president obama and a u.s. senator. paul kevin curtis has denied involvement with the suspicious mailings. at a hearing today, an f.b.i. agent testified a search found no ricin, or materials used to make it. a defense lawyer sugg
be plagued by a shortage of airport controllers, and finally, let's go local. we're in philadelphia. i say take a look at radian, housing insurance can double from 11 and change long before 2020. i bet it won't be independent by then. here's the bottom line. don't wait if you are young. put a couple of bucks away in some stocks. even students have a few extra bucks to invest. and do it for the future. just ask the people who bought berkshire hathaway 30 years ago. they're all millionaires if they bought just seven shares. you invest for the future, you must think that you can be millionaires, too. let's take our first question. >> boo-yah, jim, i'm anthony from new hampshire. >> boo-yah, anthony. >> you are always so energetic on the show. my coffee of choice is dunkin' donuts, i wonder what yours is? >> i have dunkin' donuts, i'm on the floor of the stock exchange, starbucks, i didn't like exactly what the caller called. you have to do the conference call, but i'm ecumenical and i like them both. yes. >> great to have you, jim. i'm sean from burlington. >> hey, how are you? >> my question
. if you translate that into $2,013, $11,500. the largest cities in the country were new york, philadelphia, and boston. what would week -- what should we learn about those three large cities? >> two of those 13 states were not yet members of the union. north carolina and rhode island held back when the rest of the union adopted a constitution. overwhelmingly a rural, rustic, agrarian, form- based society. it ended at the appalachian mountains. in 1800, there were three roads. that crossed. the united states was a nation in name only. it was, in fact, three estate nations -- new england, the middle states and the south and each of them had one major city. philadelphia was the largest city in the nation with all of 40,000 people. one of the things that martha washington found not altogether to her liking was the fact that she was operated -- of rude -- uprooted from the agricultural life at mount vernon that she knew and had been born into and that she had mastered in many ways and relished. it is only the latest chapter of a sacrifice which, in its own way, i think you could argue matches a
. >> you are welcome. >> brit hume or spreading the sequester pain around. first the philadelphia abortion trial, the trial and closing arguments. we will go live to shannon bream. both tylenol and bayer back & body are proven to be effective pain relievers tylenol works by blocking pain signals to your brain bayer back & body's dual action formula includes aspirin, which blocks pain at the site. try the power of bayer back & body. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn, try the power relief is at hand. for many, nexium provides 24-hour heartburn relief and may be available for just $18 a month. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doctor right away. other serious stomach conditions may exist. don't take nexium if you take clopidogrel. relief is at hand for just $18 a month. talk to your doctor about nexium. >> bret: it will soon be up to the jury. closing arguments have just finished in the trial of a philadelphia abortion doctor accused of killin
a little bit more about -- >> well, the philadelphia magazine wrote with a cover story called "being white in philly," and it was supposedly the ruminations of a white philadelphia resident that riled a lot of the population of philadelphia including the mayor and some of the black residents and black journalists in philadelphia. it got philadelphia magazine a ton of publicity. [laughter] sales went up. there were at least two forums that were held on the topic, but it raised some of the issues that we're talking about -- >> yeah. >> -- including the fact that the media in philadelphia, particularly print media, were not very diverse, and philadelphia magazine itself had no african-americans on its staff, on its editorial staff. >> yes. >> there was a piece that was written by somebody on the business staff, a black woman on the business staff who said, you know, this is, you know, horse manure what this guy is writing. but it, you know, it raised the issues that we're talking about in terms of, in terms of diversity. let me say one other thing about the previous question, and that is that
three quarters of my life. i ran away from philadelphia to fort lauderdale when i was 15, and gave birth to my oldest daughter and was labeled a habitual runaway by judge mark speiser. over the next years, i struggled with my addiction, giving birth to a son and another daughter. finally, in my late thirties, i ended up homeless, living under bridges, and i finally started going to jail. it was jail that actually saved my life, because that is where i met broward county drug court judge marcia beach, who loved me, and so i could love myself. she placed me in the sheriff's 90-day in-custody treatment program. the time there helped save my life. the last 30 days of the 90 days i did something i had never done before in my entire life. i made a plan. today, i'm an intern for intherooms.com. we are the world's largest recovery web site with over 260,000 people worldwide, sharing their experience, strength, and hope with each other, and it's powerful. today, i'd like to tell you that i'm an asset, not a liability. today, i'm a face and voice in and of recovery, and thank you for having me. (a
generation. "rocket man." >> "tiny dancer." >> translator: "tiny dancer." >> "philadelphia freedom." >> translator: "philadelphia freedom." >> and "lion king." >> translator: "lion king." [ speaking spanish ] >> translator: ladies and gentlemen, mr. elton john! [ cheers and applause ] ♪ >> hello, caracas. hello, crocodile-aracas. [ laughter ] i should confess, i didn't know hugo chavez very well. but as the saying goes, "hey, a gig is a gig." [ laughter ] i did a bit of research, and it turns out president chavez was quite a complex man. so here it goes. everything in this song is true.
videos. this is from philadelphia. two men with masks walk up to the door of this convenience store. one of them as soon as he enters the door, raises a gun, points it at the attendant while the other one hangs out as a lookout. he demands money from the attendant. when he's unable to get the money, he runs out of the store. the suspects ended up getting away. the philadelphia pd needs help identifying these men. hopefully someone will recognize the logos on their jackets. they seem to be wearing the same logo. >> weird. they walked in, they put a gun to an employee's head, walked out. they didn't get anything. strange. >> nope. nope. they got away from nothing. the video is from the u.k. at a small store. the man pays for tick tacks, takes change, comes back with chocolate bars to pretend like he's going to pay for that. when that happens, he ends up reaching over for the till. >> look at this. >> the clerk starts beating on him. the guy manages to get the drawer out of the register. the clerk wrestles the guy out the door. gets him to drop the cash drawer. the guy ended up getting away
. a once respected philadelphia physician is on trial for murder. he was accused of killing seven infants and a 41-year-old woman while performing illegal late-term abortions. investigators describe the doctor's practice as a house of horrors. this is a case with allegation that's truly are unimaginable. >> reporter: the women's medical society seemed ordinary, a neighborhood clinic serving poor women in west philadelphia. the prosecutors say it was a mill for illegal abortions, at least seven babies allegedly delivered prematurely then killed with a scissors, a snip to the spinal cord. >> it was a house of horrors. beyond any type of definition and explanation i can humbly try to give. >> reporter: the accused is a once respected physical on trial for the murder of seven infants, plus the murder of a 41-year-old woman who overdosed on an thetices he allegedly gave her. the doctor was not board certified. latoya ransom is one of his patients. she describes his office. >> i seen blood on the table that he had the utensils on. >> police have been investigating him for illegally selling pres
in philadelphia that for years, performed illegal abortions of mostly poor patients. what allegedly happened inside that abortion clinic called the women's medical society could have been stopped if any number of state agencies had done their jobs. they didn't and women and children paid the price. there were plenty of complaints over the years, plenty of malpractice, patients who died or had to be hospitalized. but, stilt, the state did nothing. in pennsylvania, abortions passed 24 weeks are illegal unless the life or health of the mother is at stake. however, this doctor, gosnell, offered illegal abortions killing an unknown number of viable fetuses. his criteria wasn't the life or health of the mother but whether they could pay in cash. it's gruesome to think about, but he did it by snipping their spinal cords with a pair of scissors. he was not certified and is now on trial on eight counts of murder. he faces the death penalty. three years ago, they raided the medical center looking for drug sales. what they found when they entered that clinic was utterly horrifying. blood on the floors,
in the grapevine. first, the defense makes a brazen and astounding move in the murder trial of a philadelphia abortion doctor. >>> george w. bush presidential library and museum is the 13th presidential museum in the national archives and records administration. it's the only one with a full scale replica where you can sit behind the desk, answer the phone, take pirs tires. having been in that oval office during the bush years, i can tell you this looks exactly the same down to every detail. coming outside, they're making final preparations for the big day. it's a very rare event on stage to get four form jer presidents altogether. it will happen on thursday. on this side you'll have the carters and clintons. on this side you'll have president bush and mrs. bush. 43. president bush and mrs. bush, 41 and you'll have the current president and mrs. obama. a big day as you look ought over the lectern there will be people from around the world and the country in a packed area. millions will be watching around the world on this dedication of the library. special report continues after the break.
driving home. as mike schuh explains, a local man has a new way to stop that smell. >> in philadelphia, and for the bay hearts, number 26, drew westerfelt is a lacrosse player. he has endured years of the unpleasant side of sports. >> it's usually disgusting. >> yes. his gear stinks. >> i think if you talk to most parents, i think they're the ones who drive home with the windows down. >> for those of who you don't know, most sweaty, hockey gear never gets washed. and if it does, the stink doesn't go away. >> it's just the norm. i don't think there's been a way to really do anything about it. >> reporter: well, until he and some of his friends who are chemists came up with this. no performs. it gets rid of body oils and natural and synthetic fabrics. >> the sticker on the front says, let your machine do the work. it's as simple as taking your gloves and arm pads and throwing it in the washing machine. i don't have the simple answer for why people haven't done this before. >> and he has a spray that keeps the funk from coming back. he said it works for all sports and athletics. he hopes
of philadelphia, we have 600 clients, i speak with just about every one of them over a period of one or two months, you know no one is talking about the sequester, no one is saying that the sequester that is hurting the business, the topic does not come up it is more about taxes, and possibility of increase taxes, that is what i'm hear from my clients and seeing inny business. neil: from your perspective, the taxpayer union, these taxes were immediate. they are constant, with us of day, every week, every paycheck. >> gene bridge brings up an impt point not just payroll tax increase, it is what is coming down the road it goes down hill from here with the medical device excise tax taking effect that ises s societe generaleiatd with obamacare -- that is associated with obamacare, tens of thousands of layoffs, and increase in income tax next year, and increase with surtax with obamacare, and complexity burdens, i was looking through this. in preparing a study that ntu is about to release, one portion of obamacare law in the last fiscal year, actually, 2011, is going to add 40 million hours of paperwor
this week with employees of the naval sea systems engineering command in philadelphia whom i represent. they're looking at a 20% pay cut because of furloughs. these are real problems that are affecting real people. the house is opting to do nothing about this. nothing. the economists have told us that these ill-advised sequestration cuts will cost the economy 750,000 jobs this year. mr. van hollen, my friend from maryland, has a bill and that bill says that we should save an amount of money equal to what the sequestration is allegedly saving and not have these cuts in cancer care and not have 1/3 of our air power grounded and not have federal employees take a 20% pay cut. mr. van hollen proposes that we cut subsidies to huge oil companies, that we cut subsidies to huge agri-businesses and we have people who make more than $1 million a year in income pay a slightly higher tax rate. we're not -- i understand, ladies and gentlemen of the house, that some would agree with that proposal and others would disagree with that proposal. that's democracy. we're not even taking a vote on that proposal.
? or should they move the capital back to philadelphia? the octagon house was only a few blocks away. they immediately began to entertain. in a grand style. this really sent a signal to diplomats in washington and congress and the people, that they were not going to turn tail and run, but stay in the capital. >> next, we will visit that house. >> this is very important for dolley madison's political career as first lady. the octagon is two blocks from the white house. it was a natural fit as they tried to resume government as quickly as possible. the majestic, elegant, spacious house was the perfect setting for the events that dolley needed to orchestrate and manage in the life of the president. this is why the house is known as the octagon. it was a round room very popular in those days. this was an important room to welcome guests. it is a round room. when you are in this room, no matter where you stand, you are equal. this was very important for dolley to make everybody feel welcome. enemies or allies. the room is a good example of why this house was so good for dolley. she was kn
that philadelphia abortion doctor kermit gosnell will not testify or call witnesses. at his own capital murder trial. the defense just rested, wow. up next, we will take a look at that development and the growing debate over president obama's decision to be the keynote speaker at a planned parenthood event thisweek after new reports suggest that that group knew about some of the horrors playing out at that abortion clinic and did nothing to stop it. next. for all kinds of reasons. i go to angie's list to gauge whether or not the projects will be done in a timely fashion and within budget. angie's list members can tell you which provider is the best in town. you'll find reviews on everything from home repair to healthcare. now that we're expecting, i like the fact that i can go onto angie's list and look for pediatricians. the service providers that i've found on angie's list actually have blown me away. join today and find out why over 1 million members count on angie's list. angie's list -- reviews you can trust. >> megyn: fox news alert. moments ago the associated press reporting that the defense
threatened to filibuster the proposed gun legislation. in philadelphia, the football league has just ended. more than 4200 former players are suing the nfl for allegedly concealing known risks to the brain from head injuries. the judge did not give a date on the ruling on whether the case will go to trial. those are your headlines. connell: thank you very much. retailers are paying more in credit card swipe fees than they made in pretax profits last year. it sounds ridiculous. jeff: it has been happening. we have those latest numbers for you. there is my credit card. every time you run this through the machine here at the 7-eleven, that is $0.25 for the folks at visa and mastercard. it is a 6 billion, $7 billion settlement. >> when you divide it out, it works out to about $200 per location. jeff: you pay more in swipe fees. >> it is a hidden clause. it is $0.25 per transaction. jeff: it sounds like a lot. it is not just a convenient store folks. >> there are a lot of people involved in this class. lower transaction counts or lower values. there you go. live from the 7-eleven. it will be in
was in the >>> big, surprising and welcome news on gun legislation today and a trial in philadelphia that could be the beginning of the end of football as we know it. but first, the most shocking piece of news today is this seemingly innocuous document. a print out of a spread sheet with numbers. boring. but what the numbers represent is a massive nationwide crime scene. no, i mean that. that document is a summary of widespread and systemic error, malfeasance and wreck. care on our banks. on military service members who are entitled to relief, of banks forclosing on homeowners who have been approve for loan modification, on homeowners not behind in their payments. not on default. current, amazingly, on that sheet of paper is the number 53, which there are at least 53 documenting cases of homeowners who are current on their payments being successfully foreclosed on. not just having foreclosure proceedings against them, but people making their payments, paying their mortgage and have their homes taken from them for now no reason. according to the findings posted today by federal bank regulator as
in philadelphia. represented doctors. the repercussions of what he has done have floated downward. it is unbelievable. it is very prevalent. it has covered teeseven has been covered every day. and a grown woman. >> first-degree. >> stepping the spinal cords after they were born alive. this case made me want to vomit. and this guy, no way he's not going to be found not guilty. >> he really believes that he is not. i have been in the courtroom. he takes notes, smiles. considers himself. he considers himself a medical missionary. he thinks he has done this to save this population of women in his cell. even if the scientific evidence is in his favor. they will want to convict them. this is the most disgusting and in this case -- and i can't believe we're not covering it more. seven babies. more than that. it's disgusting. >> it is. i don't know how they are going to have nightmares. the death penalty case. to have them -- another month of this. >> medical missionary my butt. lou: it's a horrible, horrible case. critically important. it seems to be the city of philadelphia is a war wit
on twitter. follow me at bret baier. a partial victory today for the philadelphia abortion doctor accused of murdering one patient and seven babies. it came much earlier than expected. correspondent shannon bream has the story which contains disturbing material. >> today marked the official start of the defense case on behalf of kermit gosnell. the philadelphia abortion doctor accused of killing multiple babies who were born alive at his clinic. described in the 300 page grand jury report as a place of horror. the defense attorney jack machine man successfully persuaded the judge to throw out several of the charges against gosnell. including three first-degree murder charges. mcmahon had argued that the evidence presented by the prosecution didn't support the legal case against gosnell saying, quote: there is not one piece of objective scientific evidence that anyone was born alive at gosnell's clinic. the remaining charges are significant. including four first-degree murder charges that could subject gosnell to the death penalty. the defense continues that the new independent online docu
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